August 28, 2015 at 4:44 PM

RS Motorhomes is happy to invite you for a road trip in the footsteps of William the Bastard once he set foot in England.

Pevensey

Pevensey has been inhabited for quite a long period and was home to a Roman fort built in the early 4th century AD under the name Anderitum in order to protect the South East that was constantly under pressure from the barbarians such as the Jutes and Saxons. After the Roman legions left the fort was taken by the Saxons following a long siege, burnt and left derelict. It was only reused in 1042 AD when Harold Godwinson rebuilt it to make it a stronghold. The Anglo-Saxon army used it during the summer of 1066 to meet the invading Norwegians further North. When William arrived in Sussex it was empty and made a pleasant haven for the troops to prepare for the upcoming battles.

Pevensey.jpg

You can still visit the stronghold and notice how the Roman architecture resisted the assaults of time and weather. Find more about it on the English Heritage Website.

Take the A259 to Hastings, it should take you about 20 minutes.

 

Hastings

Probably one of the most known names in Britain; Hastings, even though the battle itself happened on the outskirts of the coastal city (in Battle, East Sussex), this name is marked with the seal of history. In the city on the top of the cliff you can see Hastings Castle. Even though it was mostly destroyed by the weather it is still a worthy place to visit.

Hastings.jpg

 

Battle

This little village about 6 miles away from Hastings is home to the famous Abbey and Priory as well as the battlefield where the famous battle is supposed to have happened. The Abbey was founded at the site of the battle and its high altar set where the Anglo-Saxon King Harold had died. Do not hesitate to visit the museum of local history as well.

Battle.jpg

 

Wallingford

If you feel like continuing your road trip on the steps of the Normans in 2 and ¼ hours you should reach Wallingford where they crossed the Thames on route to Berkamsted where the English surrendered to William. The city was one of the 18 towns of the Kingdom having more than 2,000 inhabitants recorded in the 1085 Domesday Book.

Wallingford.jpg

Berkhamsted

Drive for an hour via the B4009 to reach Berkhamstead

Prior entering the city of London, William stopped by Berkhamsted to receive the surrender of Edgar the Ætheling (heir to the Anglo-Saxon throne of England), Archbishop Ealdred, Earl Edwin, Earl Morcar and the leaders of London which led to the coronation of William the Bastard to be known as King William I of England.

Berkhamsted.jpg

Let’s skip London as it will be probably more interesting to go there by train and avoid the congestion charge. If you still want to go Westminster Abbey and the Tower of London are the must do’s. You can also drive home or visit other landmarks such as Winchester or go up North to Stamford Bridge.



Tags: history england road trip
Category: Drive-aways

< Back to all Blogs

Category List


Tag List


Tag Cloud



Archive